Almostpic
This is my image bookmark
Almostpic
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prostheticknowledge:

Reverberating Across the Divide
Art tech project by Madeline Gannon for Madlab explores designing virtual forms through gestures, which are then physically realized with 3D printing - video embedded below:


Reverberating Across the Divide reconnects digital and physical contexts through a custom chronomorphologic modeling environment. The modeling interface uses a three phase workflow (3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing) to enable a designer to craft intricate digital geometries around pre-existing physical contexts.
Chronomorphology –– like its nineteenth-century counterpart chronophotography –– is a composite recording of an object’s movement. Instead of a photograph, however, the recording medium here is a full three-dimensional model of the object — a virtual creature simulated within a digital environment. This virtual creature exists as a 3D printable module; it is constructed as a closed mesh, with a spring skeleton that prevents self-intersections. The composite, chronomorphologic model (of the virtual creature over time) retains these printable properties at each time-step. Therefore, no matter how intricate or complex, the digital geometry will always be exported as a valid, 3D printable mesh.
The chronomorphologic modeling environment facilitates the rapid generation of baroque and expressive spatial forms that both respond and expand on existing physical contexts. By mediating 3D scanning and 3D printing through the modeling environment, the designer has a streamlined workflow for oscillating between virtual and analog environments. This ease between digital design and physical production provides a framework for rapidly exploring how subtle changes in the virtual environment, physical environment, or designer’s gestures can create dynamic variation in the formal, material, and spatial qualities of a generated design.

Examples developed with this project includes not only wearables, but also possibilities for sculptural motifs.
You can find out more about the project at Madlab here
prostheticknowledge:

Reverberating Across the Divide
Art tech project by Madeline Gannon for Madlab explores designing virtual forms through gestures, which are then physically realized with 3D printing - video embedded below:


Reverberating Across the Divide reconnects digital and physical contexts through a custom chronomorphologic modeling environment. The modeling interface uses a three phase workflow (3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing) to enable a designer to craft intricate digital geometries around pre-existing physical contexts.
Chronomorphology –– like its nineteenth-century counterpart chronophotography –– is a composite recording of an object’s movement. Instead of a photograph, however, the recording medium here is a full three-dimensional model of the object — a virtual creature simulated within a digital environment. This virtual creature exists as a 3D printable module; it is constructed as a closed mesh, with a spring skeleton that prevents self-intersections. The composite, chronomorphologic model (of the virtual creature over time) retains these printable properties at each time-step. Therefore, no matter how intricate or complex, the digital geometry will always be exported as a valid, 3D printable mesh.
The chronomorphologic modeling environment facilitates the rapid generation of baroque and expressive spatial forms that both respond and expand on existing physical contexts. By mediating 3D scanning and 3D printing through the modeling environment, the designer has a streamlined workflow for oscillating between virtual and analog environments. This ease between digital design and physical production provides a framework for rapidly exploring how subtle changes in the virtual environment, physical environment, or designer’s gestures can create dynamic variation in the formal, material, and spatial qualities of a generated design.

Examples developed with this project includes not only wearables, but also possibilities for sculptural motifs.
You can find out more about the project at Madlab here
prostheticknowledge:

Reverberating Across the Divide
Art tech project by Madeline Gannon for Madlab explores designing virtual forms through gestures, which are then physically realized with 3D printing - video embedded below:


Reverberating Across the Divide reconnects digital and physical contexts through a custom chronomorphologic modeling environment. The modeling interface uses a three phase workflow (3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing) to enable a designer to craft intricate digital geometries around pre-existing physical contexts.
Chronomorphology –– like its nineteenth-century counterpart chronophotography –– is a composite recording of an object’s movement. Instead of a photograph, however, the recording medium here is a full three-dimensional model of the object — a virtual creature simulated within a digital environment. This virtual creature exists as a 3D printable module; it is constructed as a closed mesh, with a spring skeleton that prevents self-intersections. The composite, chronomorphologic model (of the virtual creature over time) retains these printable properties at each time-step. Therefore, no matter how intricate or complex, the digital geometry will always be exported as a valid, 3D printable mesh.
The chronomorphologic modeling environment facilitates the rapid generation of baroque and expressive spatial forms that both respond and expand on existing physical contexts. By mediating 3D scanning and 3D printing through the modeling environment, the designer has a streamlined workflow for oscillating between virtual and analog environments. This ease between digital design and physical production provides a framework for rapidly exploring how subtle changes in the virtual environment, physical environment, or designer’s gestures can create dynamic variation in the formal, material, and spatial qualities of a generated design.

Examples developed with this project includes not only wearables, but also possibilities for sculptural motifs.
You can find out more about the project at Madlab here
prostheticknowledge:

Reverberating Across the Divide
Art tech project by Madeline Gannon for Madlab explores designing virtual forms through gestures, which are then physically realized with 3D printing - video embedded below:


Reverberating Across the Divide reconnects digital and physical contexts through a custom chronomorphologic modeling environment. The modeling interface uses a three phase workflow (3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing) to enable a designer to craft intricate digital geometries around pre-existing physical contexts.
Chronomorphology –– like its nineteenth-century counterpart chronophotography –– is a composite recording of an object’s movement. Instead of a photograph, however, the recording medium here is a full three-dimensional model of the object — a virtual creature simulated within a digital environment. This virtual creature exists as a 3D printable module; it is constructed as a closed mesh, with a spring skeleton that prevents self-intersections. The composite, chronomorphologic model (of the virtual creature over time) retains these printable properties at each time-step. Therefore, no matter how intricate or complex, the digital geometry will always be exported as a valid, 3D printable mesh.
The chronomorphologic modeling environment facilitates the rapid generation of baroque and expressive spatial forms that both respond and expand on existing physical contexts. By mediating 3D scanning and 3D printing through the modeling environment, the designer has a streamlined workflow for oscillating between virtual and analog environments. This ease between digital design and physical production provides a framework for rapidly exploring how subtle changes in the virtual environment, physical environment, or designer’s gestures can create dynamic variation in the formal, material, and spatial qualities of a generated design.

Examples developed with this project includes not only wearables, but also possibilities for sculptural motifs.
You can find out more about the project at Madlab here
prostheticknowledge:

Reverberating Across the Divide
Art tech project by Madeline Gannon for Madlab explores designing virtual forms through gestures, which are then physically realized with 3D printing - video embedded below:


Reverberating Across the Divide reconnects digital and physical contexts through a custom chronomorphologic modeling environment. The modeling interface uses a three phase workflow (3D scanning, 3D modeling, and 3D printing) to enable a designer to craft intricate digital geometries around pre-existing physical contexts.
Chronomorphology –– like its nineteenth-century counterpart chronophotography –– is a composite recording of an object’s movement. Instead of a photograph, however, the recording medium here is a full three-dimensional model of the object — a virtual creature simulated within a digital environment. This virtual creature exists as a 3D printable module; it is constructed as a closed mesh, with a spring skeleton that prevents self-intersections. The composite, chronomorphologic model (of the virtual creature over time) retains these printable properties at each time-step. Therefore, no matter how intricate or complex, the digital geometry will always be exported as a valid, 3D printable mesh.
The chronomorphologic modeling environment facilitates the rapid generation of baroque and expressive spatial forms that both respond and expand on existing physical contexts. By mediating 3D scanning and 3D printing through the modeling environment, the designer has a streamlined workflow for oscillating between virtual and analog environments. This ease between digital design and physical production provides a framework for rapidly exploring how subtle changes in the virtual environment, physical environment, or designer’s gestures can create dynamic variation in the formal, material, and spatial qualities of a generated design.

Examples developed with this project includes not only wearables, but also possibilities for sculptural motifs.
You can find out more about the project at Madlab here
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(via stfj 3.0)
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new-aesthetic:

“I linked 64 public-access web cameras across Europe, recording the colour of the sky, at each point, at regular intervals. Together, the cameras paint the weather, once every hour. The book collects a week of paintings.”
Jed Carter — Eyes on The Sky
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(via PirateBox DIY - David Darts Wiki)
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Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
Beer Dawg is a game created during a 2 days gamejam with the UCLA Game Lab student in Los Angeles.The idea was to use arduino and unity, creating a digital and/or analog game.
This game takes place in an american campus where a frat dude is drunk, lost and has to go to his room avoiding teachers and girl friend. The controllers are a beer can and a real hotdog, both fixed to a knob and a fader. The arcade console looks like casual meal trays with garbage on it.In this two player game one player controls the x-axis and the other one the y-axis.
Concept, Game design and Product Design :Steven AmrheinMarion BareilAliah DarkDennis Rosenfeld
Gamejam hosted by UCLA Game Lab, Eddo Stern and Douglas Edric Stanley.

->My portfolio link
->UCLA Gamelab
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strapazzolli:

Katerina Jebb.
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aqqindex:

Wendell Castle, Enclosed Reclining Environment, 1969
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carre-blanc:

Bodo Sperlein, “Nikko Cloud”.
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pariahs-muse:

By Handson